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Tui St. George Tucker (1924-2004)

Born 25 November 1924
Fullerton, CA
Died 21 April 2004
Boone, NC
Nationality American
Era Modern

Tui St. George Tucker was born in California, where she attended Occidental College from 1941 to 1944. In 1946, she moved to New York City where she became a member of the underground music scene. In the late 40s, St. George Tucker established Camp Catawba for Boys in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. She would spend her summers for most of her life as the camp’s music director, while her partner Vera Lachmann taught poetry and helped with the day-to-day operations. St. George Tucker described her music as “underground,” favoring many avant-garde techniques, including microtones, multiphonics, and extended ranges. Even when experimenting with the limits of music and sound, she never lost her sense of melodic character. Many of her works retain a folk-like quality or are reminiscent of plainchant. St. George Tucker was a virtuoso recorder player and was recognized during her lifetime for bringing new listeners to the instrument.

See Also:
Richard Grissom and David Lasocki. The Recorder: A Research and Information Guide. New York: Routledge, 2012.

tuistgeorgetucker.com

http://www.collections.library.appstate.edu/findingaids/ac940

Born 25 November 1924
Fullerton, CA
Died 21 April 2004
Boone, NC
Nationality American
Era Modern

Tui St. George Tucker was born in California, where she attended Occidental College from 1941 to 1944. In 1946, she moved to New York City where she became a member of the underground music scene. In the late 40s, St. George Tucker established Camp Catawba for Boys in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. She would spend her summers for most of her life as the camp’s music director, while her partner Vera Lachmann taught poetry and helped with the day-to-day operations. St. George Tucker described her music as “underground,” favoring many avant-garde techniques, including microtones, multiphonics, and extended ranges. Even when experimenting with the limits of music and sound, she never lost her sense of melodic character. Many of her works retain a folk-like quality or are reminiscent of plainchant. St. George Tucker was a virtuoso recorder player and was recognized during her lifetime for bringing new listeners to the instrument.

See Also:
Richard Grissom and David Lasocki. The Recorder: A Research and Information Guide. New York: Routledge, 2012.

tuistgeorgetucker.com

http://www.collections.library.appstate.edu/findingaids/ac940